Tag Archives: Mars

Curiosity rover celebrates second anniversary on Mars as it approaches mountain goal

A “self-portrait” of the Curiosity rover in Yellowknife Bay, with part of Mount Sharp in the background. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

A “self-portrait” of the Curiosity rover in Yellowknife Bay, with part of Mount Sharp in the background. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Curiosity rover has been actively exploring Mars for two years now, and as it celebrated its second anniversary today, Aug. 5, it is also, after a lengthy journey, approaching its primary mission goal: the massive Mount Sharp in the middle of Gale crater.

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MRO finds new evidence for dry ice formation of gullies on Mars

Before and after images showing the formation of a new gully channel in Terra Sirenum, taken between Nov. 5, 2010 and May 25, 2013. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Before and after images showing the formation of a new gully channel in Terra Sirenum, taken between Nov. 5, 2010 and May 25, 2013. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Some of the most interesting features on the surface of Mars are its gullies, often found on crater walls or other slopes, first seen from orbit back in 2000. They resemble gullies on Earth created by water, but the origin of located on Mars have become the subject of much debate. These gullies appear to be actively forming today, and are not just some relic of past activity that took place millions of years ago. But on Mars, water can’t exist for long on the surface even if it is briny, so how are these gullies being created? New observations from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft suggest that dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) may actually be responsible. The new findings have been published in the journal Icarus.

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New study shows how salts could make liquid water on Mars

The Phoenix lander was the first mission to land near the Martian north pole. Was it also the first to see evidence of liquid water on Mars? Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University

The Phoenix lander was the first mission to land near the Martian north pole. Was it also the first to see evidence of liquid water on Mars? Credit: NASA/ JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University

The search for evidence of water on Mars, past or present, has been one of the driving forces behind the exploration of the Red Planet for several decades now. While orbiters, landers, and rovers have all found abundant evidence for a lot of water in Mars’ ancient history, the question of whether there could still be any of the wet stuff existing today is still open and unanswered. There are hints, but proof is still elusive. Now, a new study provides new information on how liquid water could be found on Mars’ surface today, albeit in small amounts or for brief periods of time.

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Image Gallery: Pillinger Point at Endeavour crater

View of Endeavour crater from Pillinger Point. Click for larger version. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/James Sorenson

View of Endeavour crater from Pillinger Point. Click for larger version. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/James Sorenson

The Opportunity rover continues to send back wonderful images of its current location on the rim of Endeavour crater. This new panorama shows the view from Pillinger Point (named after the late planetary scientist Colin Pillinger). The Pillinger Point rock outcrop is on the slopes Solander Point, one of the taller peaks on the rim of the huge crater. What a view! Thanks to James Sorenson who created this panorama from the Opportunity images. The full-size image is available here. There is also a zoomable Gigapan version here.

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Image Gallery: Martian meteorites in Gale crater

Possible meteorite found by Curiosity, sol 640. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Possible meteorite found by Curiosity, sol 640. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity has come across what appear to be a couple of meteorites in Gale crater. No official word yet, but the consensus seems to be that these are indeed meteorites, and fairly large ones, given their similarity to other confirmed meteorites found previously by both the Spirit and Opportunity rovers. Their shininess indicates that they are likely iron meteorites. It is more common to find meteorites on Mars than on Earth, given the thinner atmosphere and slower erosion rates.

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New meteor-impact crater on Mars is largest ever found

Image of the largest fresh crater ever seen on Mars, taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Smaller craters nearby may be due to secondary impacts of smaller pieces of rocky meteorites. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Image of the largest fresh crater ever seen on Mars, taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Smaller craters nearby may be due to secondary impacts of smaller pieces of rocky meteorites. Click for larger version. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Newly-formed, fresh meteor craters have been found on the planet Mars before, but a new one seen by the cameras on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is the largest ever seen so far.

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Curiosity completes third drilling in search of Martian organics

Image of new drill holes at the Windjana location created by the Curiosity rover. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Image of new drill holes at the Windjana location created by the Curiosity rover. Click for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

The Curiosity rover has now completed its third successful drilling, this time in Martian sandstone, it was announced yesterday, May 6, 2014, by NASA.

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Image Gallery: Curiosity ‘selfie’ at Mount Remarkable

"Selfie" of Curiosity at Mount Remarkable. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Damia Bouic

“Selfie” of Curiosity at Mount Remarkable. Click for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Damia Bouic

The Curiosity rover has taken another great “selfie” image of itself as it sits parked at Mount Remarkable, the butte where it will soon do some more drilling. This is another beautiful montage by Damia Bouic consisting of many separate images spliced together. Mount Remarkable is just out of view to the left and Mount Sharp is in the distance. The full-size image is here.

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Image Gallery: delicate erosion and sand flows at Mount Remarkable

Very thin, delicate-looking "lattice-like" protrusion of rock at Mount Remarkable, one of the three main buttes at The Kimberley. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Very thin and delicate-looking “lattice-like” protrusion of rock near the base of Mount Remarkable, one of the three main buttes at The Kimberley. Sol 601. Click for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

The rock outcrops at Mount Remarkable, one of the three main buttes at The Kimberley location where the Curiosity rover is now are a geological bonanza, with a wide variety of rock types and formations. The buttes are surrounded by finely layered rock slabs, and some of the smaller features seen are amazingly delicate-looking, like in these two photos. Original larger images here and here.

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Image Gallery: Mount Remarkable and Cape Tribulation

Mount Remarkable as seen by Curiosity on sol 603. Click for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Damia Bouic

Mount Remarkable as seen by Curiosity on sol 603. Click for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / Damia Bouic

Two more great panoramic images from Damia Bouic, showing the current locations of the Curiosity and Opportunity rovers on Mars. The first from Curiosity is a view of Mount Remarkable, one of the three main buttes in The Kimberley region, where Curiosity will soon do more drilling to search for organics. In the second, Opportunity looks at the Cape Tribulation hills on the edge of Endeavour crater which it is continuing to travel towards in search of more clay minerals.

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