Image Gallery: weird round landform on Mars

Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
Click for larger version. Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

An unusual round landform in the Athabasca region on Mars, as seen by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The round “island” is isolated, sitting in a “sea” of old smooth lava flows. How it formed isn’t known yet, but theories include that it was pushed up somehow by lava or ice that was melted by the lava. There are a lot of lava flows in this region, so the involvement of volcanism is a likely possibility. Another interesting Martian puzzle!

Paul Scott Anderson is a freelance space writer with a life-long passion for space exploration and astronomy. He started his blog The Meridiani Journal in 2005, which is a chronicle of planetary exploration. He also publishes The Exoplanet Report e-paper. In 2011, he started writing about space on a freelance basis, and now also currently write for AmericaSpace and Examiner.com. He has also written for Universe Today and SpaceFlight Insider, has been published in The Mars Quarterly and has done supplementary writing for the well-known iOS app Exoplanet for iPhone and iPad.

Image Gallery: polygons in Martian crater

polygons
Click for larger version. Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

New HiRISE image from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter showing an amazing network of polygon fractures inside a crater. The fractures are thought to be caused by the cracking of ice-cemented soil (permafrost). They are also known as periglacial landforms, such as in the polar regions on Earth. They are common on Mars, even near the equator, where there are large amounts of subsurface ice.

Paul Scott Anderson is a freelance space writer with a life-long passion for space exploration and astronomy. He started his blog The Meridiani Journal in 2005, which is a chronicle of planetary exploration. He also publishes The Exoplanet Report e-paper. In 2011, he started writing about space on a freelance basis, and now also currently write for AmericaSpace and Examiner.com. He has also written for Universe Today and SpaceFlight Insider, has been published in The Mars Quarterly and has done supplementary writing for the well-known iOS app Exoplanet for iPhone and iPad.

MRO finds new evidence for dry ice formation of gullies on Mars

Before and after images showing the formation of a new gully channel in Terra Sirenum, taken between Nov. 5, 2010 and May 25, 2013. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona
Before and after images showing the formation of a new gully channel in Terra Sirenum, taken between Nov. 5, 2010 and May 25, 2013. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Some of the most interesting features on the surface of Mars are its gullies, often found on crater walls or other slopes, first seen from orbit back in 2000. They resemble gullies on Earth created by water, but the origin of located on Mars have become the subject of much debate. These gullies appear to be actively forming today, and are not just some relic of past activity that took place millions of years ago. But on Mars, water can’t exist for long on the surface even if it is briny, so how are these gullies being created? New observations from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) spacecraft suggest that dry ice (frozen carbon dioxide) may actually be responsible. The new findings have been published in the journal Icarus.

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Paul Scott Anderson is a freelance space writer with a life-long passion for space exploration and astronomy. He started his blog The Meridiani Journal in 2005, which is a chronicle of planetary exploration. He also publishes The Exoplanet Report e-paper. In 2011, he started writing about space on a freelance basis, and now also currently write for AmericaSpace and Examiner.com. He has also written for Universe Today and SpaceFlight Insider, has been published in The Mars Quarterly and has done supplementary writing for the well-known iOS app Exoplanet for iPhone and iPad.

New meteor-impact crater on Mars is largest ever found

Image of the largest fresh crater ever seen on Mars, taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Smaller craters nearby may be due to secondary impacts of smaller pieces of rocky meteorites. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona
Image of the largest fresh crater ever seen on Mars, taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Smaller craters nearby may be due to secondary impacts of smaller pieces of rocky meteorites. Click for larger version. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Newly-formed, fresh meteor craters have been found on the planet Mars before, but a new one seen by the cameras on NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is the largest ever seen so far.

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Paul Scott Anderson is a freelance space writer with a life-long passion for space exploration and astronomy. He started his blog The Meridiani Journal in 2005, which is a chronicle of planetary exploration. He also publishes The Exoplanet Report e-paper. In 2011, he started writing about space on a freelance basis, and now also currently write for AmericaSpace and Examiner.com. He has also written for Universe Today and SpaceFlight Insider, has been published in The Mars Quarterly and has done supplementary writing for the well-known iOS app Exoplanet for iPhone and iPad.

Image Gallery: a heart in Ascraeus Mons

Interesting feature near the Ascraeus Mons volcano. Click for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL / University of Arizona
Interesting feature near the Ascraeus Mons volcano. Click for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL / University of Arizona

Mars has a lot of unusual geological features, and this new image from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is a good example of that. Somewhat heart-shaped, south of the Ascraeus Mons volcano on the Tharsis volcanic plateau. How did it form?

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Paul Scott Anderson is a freelance space writer with a life-long passion for space exploration and astronomy. He started his blog The Meridiani Journal in 2005, which is a chronicle of planetary exploration. He also publishes The Exoplanet Report e-paper. In 2011, he started writing about space on a freelance basis, and now also currently write for AmericaSpace and Examiner.com. He has also written for Universe Today and SpaceFlight Insider, has been published in The Mars Quarterly and has done supplementary writing for the well-known iOS app Exoplanet for iPhone and iPad.

Image Gallery: cracked dome

Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
Click for larger version. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

An interesting circular mound in the Nilosyrtis region on Mars, photographed by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. How did the flat top get all cracked like that? Original images are here.

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Paul Scott Anderson is a freelance space writer with a life-long passion for space exploration and astronomy. He started his blog The Meridiani Journal in 2005, which is a chronicle of planetary exploration. He also publishes The Exoplanet Report e-paper. In 2011, he started writing about space on a freelance basis, and now also currently write for AmericaSpace and Examiner.com. He has also written for Universe Today and SpaceFlight Insider, has been published in The Mars Quarterly and has done supplementary writing for the well-known iOS app Exoplanet for iPhone and iPad.

Boulders provide new clues to ancient ocean on Mars

Illustration showing how the ancient Oceanus Borealis may have looked on Mars. Credit: ESA / C. Carreau
Illustration showing how the ancient Oceanus Borealis may have looked on Mars. Credit: ESA / C. Carreau

The possibility of an ancient Martian ocean is an enticing one, and there has been growing evidence that it did indeed exist (dubbed Oceanus Borealis), covering most of the northern hemisphere, and about a third of the planet, billions of years ago. Now, some new observations of boulders in what likely used to be the ocean bottom have given scientists additional clues as to what this ocean was like, it was announced this past Saturday (February 15, 2014).

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Paul Scott Anderson is a freelance space writer with a life-long passion for space exploration and astronomy. He started his blog The Meridiani Journal in 2005, which is a chronicle of planetary exploration. He also publishes The Exoplanet Report e-paper. In 2011, he started writing about space on a freelance basis, and now also currently write for AmericaSpace and Examiner.com. He has also written for Universe Today and SpaceFlight Insider, has been published in The Mars Quarterly and has done supplementary writing for the well-known iOS app Exoplanet for iPhone and iPad.