This Mars rock has teeth

Part of the rock outcrop called Cooperstown. Interesting pointed protrusions can be seen. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Part of the rock outcrop called Cooperstown. Interesting pointed protrusions can be seen in this Mastcam image from sol 440. Click image for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

As the Curiosity rover currently inspects a rock outcrop called Cooperstown, this rock seems to be baring its teeth. Some interesting pointed protrusions can be seen near the middle and lower right of the image. Below is a closeup of one of these teeth-like protrusions. Fossilized Martian shark teeth? No, probably not, but they are an intriguing feature for sure.

Close-up view of one of the teeth-like protrusions, from sol 442. Click image for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Close-up Mastcam view of one of the teeth-like protrusions, from sol 442. Click image for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Close-up Chemcam view of the same protrusion, from sol 442. Click image for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Close-up ChemCam view of the same protrusion, from sol 443. Click image for larger version. Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech

Paul Scott Anderson is a freelance space writer with a life-long passion for space exploration and astronomy. He currently writes for The Spaceflight Group, AmericaSpace and Examiner.com. His own blog The Meridiani Journal is a chronicle of planetary exploration.
 
Want more? Follow TMJ on TwitterFacebookGoogle+ and Pinterest or subscribe by email or rss (right sidebar) to get the latest blog posts and other space news.

One thought on “This Mars rock has teeth

  1. Gosh, if I didn’t know better, I’d say it looks like a fossilized fish, with an eye behind and above the mouth (teeth), and even a fin behind that, before the head. Nah…couldn’t be, right?

Thoughts? Leave a comment below!